Golf Clubs: You use Them While You’re at Them: Communication on the Green

Again a different piece i thought was remarkable on the subject of radio accessory’s, what would you do if i didn’t post this ehh? you’d have to look at the original content, the chances you found it would be slim, so deem yourself fortunate that i’ve shared this glorious short article with you.

Golf clubs (by which we mean the locations, not the implements) are huge expanses of land. They cover vast distances, employ large amounts of people and are reasonably complicated environments to run.

In addition to the necessity of expedient communication between various layers of management, general health and safety concerns and the dedication required to keep a good course looking pristine, two way radios are vital to golf clubs for keeping staff connected with each other. They also help to provide security over large spaces and much more besides. Let’s go into all this in a bit more detail, shall we?

Two-way radios are easy to use, cost effective and supremely reliable. A mobile phone (or similar gadget) simply would not be anywhere near as dependable in the same circumstances, especially when one considers that most of a golf course is outdoors and therefore subject to weather, atmospheric conditions and other intangibles.

Two-way radios are rugged devices, designed for use on all kinds of terrain. When the tasks required are largely outdoors, it makes sense to employ the same technology that soldiers use in the desert or the police use in the city, doesn’t it?

Radios offer a fast and effective response to emergencies of any kind. Instant communication is a vital tool when it comes to reporting on a mishap and ensuring that help arrives A.S.A.P. Radios also allow staff to report on the condition of the green, relaying player feedback directly to management, ensuring a swift and professional response to any concerns. This, in turn, can help to cultivate customer loyalty, providing a good club with legions of devoted players who will attract other customers and thus provide the club with steady business.

But that isn’t all a walkie-talkie is good for at a golf course. In general, golf courses require a high degree of management skill and the key to good management is good communication. Two-way radios help to ensure that the on-course staff are prepared for the player’s individual needs. Radios help the other amenities of the club (shops, restaurants, toilets etc) to run smoothly and continue to offer high standards and quality service.

Without radios, a golf club would require several levels of management, if only to handle all the travel between spaces. The management of a decent course would represent a logistical nightmare. A long, leisurely round of golf (enjoyed by everyone from Larry David to Alice Cooper) could instead represent a stress-filled, obstacle-riddled game that many would give up on before they ever even teed off.

広告

Sony NWZ-WH303 headphones review

So i discovered this short article on the internet and i was told that just posting it like a whole piece is not an excellent thing, I got permission from the original writer and read up the way to curate content, so this is it…….i thought this was interesting as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working inside the industry.

Sony NWZ-WH303 headphones review
Love

It can even blast songs out of the built-in speakers, if you really want to annoy everyone on the bus. But can it compete with the likes of the Sennheiser Momentum On-Ear in terms of performance?

Sony NWZ-WH303: Size and build

The Sony NWZ-WH303 is a chunky old pair, but then it has to be to incorporate the 4GB onboard memory. Sling it round your neck and the leather earcups are big enough to double as a nice chin rest. If subtlety is your thing, look elsewhere.

We tested the white pair, which was a bit gaudy for our tastes. But it also comes in black.

It’s a solid pair of headphones, and feels like it’s built to take a knock or two. But it’s a bit plasticky, and feels cheap next to the likes of the Bose AE2.

The Sony NWZ-WH303 weighs 292g, which won’t be too noticeable in your bag. It’s worth noting it doesn’t fold up like the Sennheiser PX 200-II or the B&W P3 so it’s not the most portable pair around.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Comfort

The faux-leather earcups and headband make the Sony NWZ-WH303 a comfy pair to wear – after a while, you can easily forget you’re wearing headphones at all, which is a real plus, especially given how chunky a pair it is.

It also doesn’t make your ears too hot after prolonged wearing, which we’ve found on some other on-ear pairs, like the Sol Republic Tracks HD.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Durability

Despite being a bit plasticky, the Sony NWZ-WH303 feels sturdy enough to survive being chucked in a bag along with your other gadgets. The only delicate parts are the controls on the bottom of the right earpiece, but even they should withstand a fair bit of punishment.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Sound quality

So how does it actually sound? Not fantastic, to be honest. There’s a real loss of detail, especially when you play songs through the speakers rather than the headphones. The guitars on AC/DC’s For Those About To Rock (We Salute You) sounded very fuzzy, and this was even more noticeable when pumped up loud. Bass is heavy, but lacks punchiness, and the treble is a bit underwhelming.

They let in a lot of background sound too, which is disappointing for an on-ear pair. Walk around town in them, and you’ll have to crank the volume up to block out the traffic noise. Switch to speaker mode, and they can go loud enough to annoy the bus, or entertain a few pals. But it’s not going to start a party.

The controls are a bit limited. For a start, they’re on the underside of the earcup, which isn’t the most intuitive place for them. They can only control songs stored on the built-in memory, so you can’t use them to control tracks played from an MP3 player.

You can’t fast forward within a song either, you have to skip to the next track or folder. You also can’t play songs from your MP3 player through the Sony NWZ-WH303’s speakers, only tracks stored on the onboard memory. All of which seems a bit of an oversight.

But getting songs onto the flash memory is a doddle. Plug the Sony NWZ-WH303 into your computer, and it’ll appear as an external hard drive would. Then you just drag and drop, or install the Content Transfer program.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Verdict

The Sony NWZ-WH303 gets full points for ingenuity, and it’s a fair price given that it’s effectively three products in one. But it’s more of a (headphone) jack of all trades, and master of none.