Private Pilots Shouldn’t Take Off Without a Backup Radio

With a lot information around the internet about earpiece’s it is hard to discover the top and generally honest information. here’s an article from a reputable site that i believe as accurate, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

headset. earphonesThose of you who follow my adventures know that I can fly to wherever there’s a communications emergency. Regular folks need a plane—but what do private pilots need? They need two-way radios, of course!
A recent story on TodaysWirelessWorld.com explained how many private pilots wouldn’t consider taking to the air without a backup radio. “Imagine what happens if an airplane’s primary radio fails in flight,” the story says. “You’re thousands of feet in the air, at the controls of an expensive aircraft with no ability to monitor weather and emergency channels or communicate with control towers, ground crews, and other pilots. Getting down safely suddenly becomes more theoretical than a sure thing.”
The story goes on to review some key considerations for a pilot using a handheld aircraft radio as a backup:
1. Mind your power supply. “While rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries usually have the longest battery life, you really want a rechargeable battery that will hold a charge for a very long time. Standard rechargeable batteries lose their charge quickly, but ‘low-discharge’ batteries can hold up to 70% of their charge for years on end.”
2. Get yourself trained. “On the ground, walk through all the steps for getting your backup radio up and running, including finding proper frequencies for nearby control towers. Also be sure to practice using your handheld in flight. Having the whole radio in your hand while working the plane’s controls is a bit more complicated than talking into a mic.”
3. Save your most-used frequencies. “Every radio manufacturer has its own way of saving most-used frequencies. Sometimes you’ll have to break out your user manual to figure out how to program and recall saved channels. Be sure to add the process for recalling saved channels to your drilling and training.”
That’s good advice for pilots and everyone else who needs to keep a two-radio handy in case of an emergency. Radios are useful and versatile tools, but it’s up to us to make sure they’re ready to help us when we need it.
– See more at: http://blog.bearcom.com/2013/11/private-pilots-shouldnt-take-off-without-a-backup-radio/#sthash.c2NuCMV7.dpuf

See more at: http://blog.bearcom.com/2013/11/private-pilots-shouldnt-take-off-without-a-backup-radio/#sthash.c2NuCMV7.dpuf

広告

The headphones revolution: bright colours, street styling spark new craze

Anyway ladies and gentlemen, i’ve a new brilliant radio accessory article for you to read, i know, you don’t have to thank me each and every one, just add a social like to the short article to illustrate your appreciation.

Anyone considering buying headphones for a young relative this Christmas, take care before splashing out the £150 or more that the most fashionable – the Beats, or Skullcandy, or Urbanears models – can cost.

Each brand marks them out as one of a “tribe”, regardless of sound quality. Whereas 20 years ago the most important thing for a teenager was the brand of trainer on their feet – Nike, Reebok or Adidas – now it’s the brand covering their ears that matters.

Beats headphones, with their red cord and large “b” on the earpieces, began appearing in music videos in late 2008, largely through the efforts of the company’s co-founders, the rapper Dr Dre and the music entrepreneur Jimmy Iovine. That sparked rocketing sales to a teenage demographic looking for a new way to distinguish themselves out from their peers.

In doing so, Beats’ emergence showed that high-priced headphones would sell, becoming as much a fashion accessory as a gadget, commanding prices over £200 – a bracket previously reserved for the audiophile niche.

A decade ago, the white tendrils of an iPod’s headphones might have marked the wearer out as trendy; nowadays it makes them just one of the crowd, and Apple’s in-ear headphones are too common to bother with. A teenager wanting to stand out needs something big – and bold.

“Companies like Beats and Skullcandy have realised that kids today want something that looks better, over questions of sound quality,” says Sam Ruffe, who works at The Kinc, a marketing agency whose clients include Skullcandy.

And those kids (or their parents) will pay: worldwide, the market for headphones will be worth over £5bn ($8bn) this year, with 284m units shipped, according to the consumer consultancy Futuresource; over-ear headphones grabbed half of sales. And Beats alone will grab around £1.25bn – while the total market is forecast to grow by 5% annually for the next five years.

Skullcandy was originally designed for skiers and snowboarders, by Rick Alden, who got the idea on a chairlift in Park City, Utah. Starting in 2003, he managed to persuade skating and skiing shops to stock the product, which became known as an “extreme sports” brand.

Urbanears, meanwhile, brought Scandinavian design and a flourish of colour to the burgeoning headphone market, releasing two “collections” of headphones a year in limited-edition colours.

The continued success of Beats brought competition as these other brands began chasing the new demographic of people willing to spend money to wear their branding choice on their ears. Skullcandy moved off the slopes and into the high street. Now, they are more likely to be seen on the bus than on the piste.

Audiophiles aren’t impressed by the brigade of bolshy Beats products, which often pride bass and look over acoustic refinement. “I just bought a set of the Beats Solo HD headphones – it’s a Christmas gift for my 13-year-old daughter,” Chris Miller, a software engineer, told the Guardian, adding: “I think they are overpriced and you are paying a premium for the brand name. They aren’t bad, but I have headphones that sound better for half the price that I paid for the Beats.”

Sound quality, though, isn’t necessarily the point – which may have been missed by more traditional “audiophile” brands such as Germany’s Sennheiser, the Dutch brand Philips and the American Bose, who were caught unaware that colouring the earpiece and cord green or red could affect sales as much as their sound quality.

Andy Watson of Futuresource says you might struggle to tell some headphones apart at the factory. “With everyone owning the same generic-looking personal audio player or mobile phone, it’s the headphones that do the differentiating. There is certainly cachet and brand equity attached to many of the brands, beyond their intrinsic value. Much of it is about positioning a lifestyle rather than a product.”

Yet the growing tribalism of headphone ownership has led to derision in some quarters – such as the blog “Long Way From Compton”, which features pictures of people wearing Beats headphones, and measuring the distance from there to the notorious gang-ridden Los Angeles district from which Dr Dre emerged.

It’s in the can

Beats Studio

Arguably one of the headphones that kicked off the large and colourful trend, the original Beats by Dre headphones drove appeal through product placement in music videos. Pushed by the music marketing powerhouse of Dr Dre (pictured above) and Jimmy Iovine, Beats brought big, aggressive bass-y sound at a big price and made it fashionable.

Bowers & Wilkins P5

Proving that expensive, fashionable headphones could sound good, the Bowers & Wilkins P5 ooze luxury and sound great, with excellent noise isolation and good range, which makes the equally pricey Beats sound downright mediocre.

Bose QuietComfort

The commuter’s favourite, Bose took noise-cancelling technology – which silences the outside world by blasting sound waves to cancel out the noise leaving only the music audible – and made it popular. On their third revision, the Bose QuietComforts are still the active noise-cancelling headphones to beat for many.

Sennheiser Momentum

Long-standing quality audio company Sennheiser was late to the stylish headphone game, but its Momentum series combines a sophisticated look with top-notch acoustics.

Starck

A collaboration between the French designer Philippe Starck and the Bluetooth specialists Parrot, Zik headphones are some of the best wireless headphones around, with intuitive touch controls, active noise-cancelling, and sound profiles and acoustics that can be modified with iPhone and Android apps.

Skullcandy Crusher

Battery-powered bass means that the Crusher gives real wallop to what otherwise might just be loud music. Cavernous earpieces (made of “soft touch” leather) also come with a powered mini-amplifier, foldable hinge (for storage) and a microphone and remote on the detachable headphone cable. CA and SG

Source – http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/dec/06/headphones-market-beats-by-dre

When you have just about any questions with regards to where by as well as the way to work with earphone (schreckengost.org), you possibly can email us with our web-page.

JBL Synchros S100i

JBL Synchros S100i
Without giving too much about this radio accessory piece, but I thought it fascinating and significant to what Im now doing.

It’s hard for earphones to stand out in the $100 price range, but the JBL S100 does a laudable job and should grab the attention of any big bass fan seeking affordable in-canal earphones. At $99.95 (direct), the sensibly priced S100 doesn’t distort on deep bass tracks and brings some serious low frequency thunder to the mix. JBL offers two S100 optionsthe S100i (with a remote optimized for iOS devices) and the S100a (with a remote optimized for Android devices). Both models are $99.95. The S100 won’t appeal to purists, but bass lovers seeking subwoofer-like lows with (some) balance in the high-mids and highs should read on.

This review is based on the JBL S100a, the Android version of the headphones. Besides a slightly different in-line remote, the S100i is effectively identical.

Design
Visually, there’s not much about the S100$99.99 at Best Buy that will knock your socks off. It’s only offered in white or black for both the Android and iOS versions, and the earpieces are simple and nondescript, with just the JBL logo to catch your eye. Each earpiece connects to a flat cord, with the inline remote control and mic just below chin level along the left ear’s cable.

There aren’t too many accessories, but each inclusion is sensible and useful. The S100 comes with three silicone eartip pairs in different sizes, one Comply foam eartip pair, a shirt clip, and a zip-up protective pouch. The Comply eartips will offer the most stable fit, but the silicone eartips are also comfortable and secure; they just block out less ambient noise than the Comply eartips do.

Performance
On tracks with powerful sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the S100 delivers some serious low-end rumble without distorting even at top (and unsafe) listening levels. At more moderate volumes, the S100 still brings more booming low end than a flat response pair would, but not so much that it’s unlistenable or woefully off-balance. Bass lovers will enjoy the S100 because it brings serious rumble, but doesn’t completely ignore the high-mids and highs necessary to keep the sound from getting muddy.

JBL S100a inlineThat said, if balance is your top priority, you’ll probably find the S100 is weighted a bit too much in favor of the lows. On Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” his baritone vocals get a lot more added richness than they probably need. There’s still plenty of treble edge there to keep a sense of clarity, providing his vocals with a decent high-mid presence and allowing the guitar strums not to get lost, but the mix seems a bit too weighted towards the lows for anyone seeking an accurate listening experience.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the big bass is on full display. The deep bass synth hits on this track are delivered with subwoofer-like gusto. The attack of the kick drum loop could use more definition in the high-mids to help it slice through the mix, however, and even though it’s never a problem to hear the various vocals on this track over the dense mix, a bit more high-mid and high presence would have balanced out the ominous bass presence.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” actually sound pretty exciting through the S100. It’s not a sound purists will gravitate towards, but the higher register strings hold their own in the mix quite wellpartially because classical recordings naturally favor the mids and the highs and often lack much in the way of low-end thunder. Here, however, the S100 adds some power to the lower register strings and percussion. The balance is more favorable here than on pop tracks that already have plenty of low-end to work with, and it’s a sound that many listeners will enjoy.

If you prefer more balance in your earphones, you have plenty of options in this general price range. Consider the TDK EB95022.49 at Amazon or the Jay t-Jays Three. If you want to spend less money but still want booming low-end in your mix, the SOL Republic Relays$79.99 at Verizon Wireless are a solid option, and the RHA MA15010.95 at Amazon is a truly inexpensive, decent-sounding pair. For $100, however, the JBL S100 offers a bass lover’s mix that doesn’t overpower, and a thoughtful array of accessories. This price range has several winners, but for lovers of deep low-end, the JBL S100 is an option worth considering.

When you loved this short article and you wish to receive more info with regards to DP3400 Two way radio Accessory please visit the web page.